MMA Refereeing Rules – Lindsay Capuano

Many prominent figures in MMA have tried Lindsay Capuano’s techniques, and most of them failed miserably. This article will show you why. First of all, Lindsay Capuano’s MMA style is very demanding. She doesn’t really care about being highly experienced or skilled, all she cares about is her flair for MMA, which as far as I can tell, is pretty good, and all she really does is train and compete like an amateur.

Lindsay Capuano’s MMA strategy revolves around submission wrestling and mount position games. Capuano prefers to take her opponent down or “resses” (mounts), throw her opponents off guard and kick them in the shin. She’s not a natural brawler, and this works well for her, because it forces her opponents to fight her for the duration of the fight. Unfortunately for her, this also works very poorly for her opponents, as they can hardly get their legs around her, while Capuano is able to move around easily, and strikes with her knees, punches and kicks, with great efficiency. Yes, Lindsay Capuano has a bit of a bulldog mentality, but in the ring she’s cold like an iceberg, her apparently high premium brand of MMA leaves much to be desired, mostly her requests for sponsorship are too high for what she deserves, and little or no quality of photos apart from the obligatory bit at the end of the fight where she’s lying on her back with her arms behind her head.

It was said during one of her matches that she’d like to hurt her opponents. I watched the fight on pay-per-view and it was quite clear from the camera angles that Capuano wasn’t actually trying to hurt her opponents, she was just trying to impose her will on them, and her game plan was working perfectly. When she knocked out Holly Holmqvist she looked more impressive to the audience than she had in her previous fights, and people were crying even before the final bell even sounded. So this is the fight game, and we’ve already established that, but it seems that the real question here is whether Capuano is up to the level of entertaining that we’ve come to expect from the MMA fighters.

At one time Capuano did have some decent wins over really good competition, but she lost five of her last six fights before finally finding some success against top opponent Diego Sanchez. She seemed to think that winning the vacant WEC Featherweight title would restore her reputation, and it certainly did help her reputation, but this was a one-sided beat down by a guy who had no business being in the fight. As far as I’m concerned, I don’t think it’s her fault that Diego Sanchez is now retired, although perhaps I’m going a little overboard here.

The one thing that I do find rather disturbing about Capuano’s current career, is that she seems to be quite content to take a beating from anyone. She even had a chance to avenge her mother’s brutal death, but she turned down the opportunity and made no attempt to redeem herself in the minds of the public. I suppose one can say that this is the way of the “Ruthless” women in boxing, you know, the ones who beat the guy up so bad they don’t want him to ever fight another woman.

However, I think it’s not her fault. I see her as a big baby in most situations, and a very immature fighter at that. If she had fought a guy who had been past her weight class, or who had trained her in the ring, she might have been a little more careful, maybe tried to go a little slower, but she would still have been finished in the first round. That says a whole lot about how she would handle a real opponent in a real fight. It’s interesting that she tries to talk her way out of a fight, but if it were me, I wouldn’t do it.